“We Cannnot–We Will Not–Comply With This Unjust Law”

A few weeks ago I wrote in this blog about the fact that our all-knowing federal government just doesn’t seem to be able to keep its hands off our personal healthcare arrangements.  I suppose as mere mortals, you and I are not bright enough to identify and purchase the health insurance that best fits our needs and our budget. 

There was surpringly little outcry or protest, presumably because most of our nation’s citizens, sadly, are used to the meddling hands of government bureaucrats being where they ought not be.  The federal government commands us in so many ways–it even gets its “own” share of our paychecks before we do.  Well, it looks like leaders of the Catholic Church aren’t going to roll over so easily. 

All around the country yesterday, letters were to be read in the pulpits of Catholic churches.  The individual letters came from local bishops and show evidence of minor differences, but their overall similarities show them to be the product of a nationwide response by the Catholic bishops as a whole.  They rightfully point out that forcing Catholic institutions to provide insurance coverage for procedures and drugs that violate authoritative Catholic teaching amounts to a denial of religious liberty.

The letters are strongly worded, and several examples can be seen on the website of Business Insider.  The sentence that I find most inspiring is straightforward and clear.  How refreshing it is to see the bishops taking a stand:  “We cannnot–we will not–comply with this unjust law.”  I stand with the bishops in support of their complaint and I thank them heartily for their courage and outspoken protest. 

Remember all the things we were promised by President Obama and the Democrats?  We’ll keep our own insurance if we wish, private insurance will remain private, costs will go down instead of up, and so many of our nation’s healthcare woes will come to an end.  Those were the promises but the realities are quite different.

Well, let me be blunt:  We told you so.  You were warned.  Political absolutists with absolute ideologies will stop at nothing to gain their way. 

 

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3 thoughts on ““We Cannnot–We Will Not–Comply With This Unjust Law”

  1. Thanks for your comment, Lorie … and thanks for following my blog. Of course, there is little in life that is cut and dry, black and white, or absolute. But I’d make two distinctions in the case at hand.

    First, the laws against polygamy are prohibitions. They prevent activities, not force activities. In addition, what is prevented is additional marriages simultaneous with an existing marriage. In the law at hand, Catholic institutions are being forced to offer something–being forced to do something that is against their authoritative teaching.

    Second, from a legal standpoint, the question arises with regard to a compelling interest. I believe the federal government should stay out of situations in which there is no clear compelling interest and for which there is no constitutional authorization. If I’m not mistaken, however, bigamy laws are state laws and not federal.

    Given all of that, however, let me make one final comment: I recognize that among Catholics, reproductive issues like abortion and birth control remain very controversial. Knowing you personally, I suspect that you and I fall into common agreement on these issues and we probably disagree with certain teachings of some Catholic leaders. For me, that in no way should empower the federal government to get involved. Working out these issues, for a religious community, belongs within that community and not in the hands of federal officials.

    • “If I’m not mistaken, however, bigamy laws are state laws and not federal.”

      Stanley Kurtz, a fellow at the Hudson Institute, lamented the modern arguments increasingly being made by various intellectuals who call for de-criminalizing polygamy. Kurtz concluded, “Marriage, as its ultramodern critics would like to say, is indeed about choosing one’s partner, and about freedom in a society that values freedom. But that’s not the only thing it is about. As the Supreme Court justices who unanimously decided Reynolds in 1878 understood, marriage is also about sustaining the conditions in which freedom can thrive. Polygamy in all its forms is a recipe for social structures that inhibit and ultimately undermine social freedom and democracy. A hard-won lesson of Western history is that genuine democratic self-rule begins at the hearth of the monogamous family.”[92]
      “Second, from a legal standpoint, the question arises with regard to a compelling interest. I believe the federal government should stay out of situations in which there is no clear compelling interest and for which there is no constitutional authorization. If I’m not mistaken, however, bigamy laws are state laws and not federal.”
      In the US, the Libertarian Party supports complete decriminalization of polygamy as part of a general belief that the government should not regulate marriages.

      Not sure about bigamy.

      Peace,
      Pat

      In the US, the Libertarian Party supports complete decriminalization of polygamy as part of a general belief that the government should not regulate marriages

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